Monthly Archives: February 2013

This Happened Edinburgh and Creative Edinburgh

Four years ago, I spent an evening at the first This Happened Edinburgh – an interesting, collaborative event where technical and creative people discussed some of their innovative projects. (I thought I had blogged about it at the time, but clearly I failed to do so!)

After a four year gap (whilst I was down in London – where there is also a regular “This Happened” but where I found it impossible to get a ticket, such was demand!), I went to This Happened Edinburgh #9 last week.

This Happened Edinburgh #1 was the first event like that I had been to: four creators discussing their projects; this time, I knew what to expect. First time around, it was in a crowded upstairs room of a pub; now it was in the much more salubrious surroundings of Edinburgh University’s Inspace gallery, a white space which may well have been designed for events such as this. Much techier, much smoother, much cooler – but much less “funky”, too, and more deliberate and knowing.

The four projects were as interesting as those four years ago – I was particularly taken with Shenando Stals examination of the emotional geography of walkers’ Edinburgh – how our emotional sense of a city is created and alters our everyday experience of place – and Gianluca Zaffiro’s description of a project involving the users of social networks managing their own data (rather than the firms running the social networks).

The mantle for the funkier side of things has been taken up by Creative Edinburgh who, amongst the other things they do, have been organising a series of irregular events called “Glug” (part of a broader programme of Glug around the UK – I do like the subtitle “Notworking”: for all the self-unemployed out there…) where entrepreneurs and artists give short talks about their projects. Loosely curated around a theme – the first one I went to was on “collectives” (from I learned that collectives come in all shapes, sizes and ideologies – and it is the people not the idea that make it work! And I meant, and failed, to write about that at the time, too); the last one, in December, was on “materials matter“, though I’m not sure the case was proven: it was the creativity and the ideas that came through for me, the materials just being the medium.

Creative Edinburgh’s Glug evenings are more entrepreneurial and less academic than This Happened; maybe a bit more social, too. Not necessarily better – just a different focus. Both present a series of fascinating, engaging talks, and I look forward to more.

Internships

On Wednesday I had a debate on Twitter about internships. Liz Cable tweeted

I tweeted my immediate reaction (well, thought about it, and edited it down to 140 characters, thought better of sending it and then changed my mind – as one does…):

And hence I got into a friendly discussion with Liz, and also with Doug Shaw, who joined in. (As an aside, this kind of discussion emphasises some of the values of Twitter: we clearly hold different viewpoints, but are able to engage with each other and debate a topic back and forth. In 140 characters…)

I was surprised by strength of my reaction, and thought I’d set out my reasons hear.

Fundamentally, it stems from a belief that if one is engaged in productive work, one should be paid for it. We have laws protecting workers from exploitation – including setting a minimum wage. (Which isn’t much.) Using interns to do “real” work – tasks which an organisation would otherwise have to pay someone to do – is exploiting them. And, because of those laws, illegal.

If firms couldn’t use interns, they may need to hire more employees, paying them real wages at the minimum wage or above.

Only those who can afford to work for (more or less) nothing can be interns. They are therefore the realm of the privileged, increasing inequality and reducing social mobility.

I also think internships teach some of the wrong lessons. If someone’s first experience of a working environment is exploitative, exploiting others appears to be ok. Indeed, by allowing this exploitation, society is implicitly making it ok. And yet we bemoan a lack of business ethics as a cause of some of our economic ills.

I can understand why young people want to do internships: in a tough job market, anything that can demonstrate skills, determination and ambition – anything that might make a CV stand out from the crowd – will be pursued.

I can definitely see why companies want interns: a cheap supply of labour; and potentially seeing able candidates perform in a working environment must be better than more formal interview processes. The major benefit will accrue to shareholders: those firms using interns will make more profits (none of which go to the interns).

It is of course not this black and white. Interns are, I’m sure, willing: they want the experience. But the power in such a relationship is so skewed towards the firms that willing or not, it is still exploitative.

I can’t reconcile where voluntary work fits in to this, either. I have done voluntary work at different times in my career, and it can be rewarding for both the worker and organisation they volunteer for. But I think the power in this relationship is much more toward the volunteer.

I’m not the only person who thinks like this. The Guardian website describes internships as “institutional exploitation” and “a scandal” – as does the Daily Telegraph’s website (the latter referring specifically to internships with MPs in Parliament). The website JobMarketSuccess outlines many of the objections I’ve expressed.

None of my criticism of internships is directed towards Liz: I’m sure she is trying to do the best those for whom she needs to source internships, and I have no doubt she, the organisations she works with, and any interns placed would work in an ethically fashion.